As many of you know we plan to launch with an American Pale Ale (APA) and a Kölsch Style Ale (KSA). Now, most people in America, and around the world, are familiar with the APA. It is more or less the beer that kicked off, and became the icon of, the craft beer revolution in America. It’s hoppy, malty, and delicious. However, the KSA, while well established, is not as well known in the States due to its low production volume. However, more brewers are turning to this delightful ale as a sessionable craft offering due to its relative ease to make and sustain.

Kolsch

The Kölsch ale hails from Cologne, Germany, and only a handful of breweries located in and around that city are legally allowed to call their beer a “Kölsch”. Because of the popularity of lagers in Germany, particularly the Pils, this delightful beer has floundered in obscurity for most of the past 100 years. However, the want of Craft brewers to add a light, clean, easy drinking offering to their lineups without the need for a long lagering process has brought this beer into the light.

For that reason, and the want to have a great beer for newcomers to transition over from light lagers, we decided to add the KSA to out initial lineup. We are very excited to offer this style and are equally excited to have you try it. Look for the Eventide Kölsch Style Ale and American Pale Ale to be served in an establishment near you very soon.

Have a great weekend, everyone!

Eventide

  • Nedko

    Looking forward to trying the APA and hoping that we’ll see an IPA (aka my litmus test)soon! The main reason only few are able to call their beers a certain name has become very controversial and is due to a EU patent trolling practice known as protected designation of origin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geographical_indications_and_traditional_specialities_in_the_European_Union). That’s the reason Champagne can’t be called champagne, cognac can’t be cognac, and trappist beer is not trappist (there is ongoing legal dispute on the latter).